NHL Playoff Game

NHL Playoff Game: Ben Bishop made 32 saves, Roope Hintz scored twice and the Dallas Stars beat the St. Louis Blues 4-2 on Saturday in Game 2 to even the Western Conference semifinal series.

Miro Heiskanen and Mattias Janmark also scored for the Stars.

Jaden Schwartz and Colton Parayko scored for St. Louis, and Jordan Binnington made 31 saves. The Blues had won three straight.

Game 3 is Monday night in Dallas.

Bishop bounced back after allowing three goals in 20 shots in a 3-2 loss in Game 1 on Thursday night.

Dallas scored three times in the opening 14:51 before Bishop took over.

Hintz, who added an empty-net-net goal with 3 seconds left, converted on a pass from Mats Zuccarello at 7:11. Heiskanen scored on a give-and-go with Hintz just over six minutes later.

The Blues answered 46 seconds later on Parayko’s drive from the top of the circle.

Dallas needed just 26 seconds to restore the two-goal lead, with Janmark scoring off a Jason Dickinson’s pass.

Schwartz tipped in a shot from Parayko with 1:48 left in the third. Schwartz has a team-high five goals in the first two rounds.

Blue Jackets 3, Bruins 2: Matt Duchene scored on a power play at 3:42 of the second overtime to give the Columbus Blue Jackets a 3-2 victory over the Boston Bruins early Sunday morning, tying the second-round playoff series at a game apiece.

Artemi Panarin scored twice and assisted on the winner and Sergei Bobrovsky stopped 29 shots. The Blue Jackets twice gave up a lead and twice came back to tie it.

Matt Grzelcyk and David Pastrnak scored and Tuukka Rask made 36 saves for Boston. The Bruins won the opener — also in overtime.

The series moves to Columbus for Games 3 and 4 on Tuesday and Thursday nights.
The St. Louis Blues matched their longest road winning streak in the Stanley Cup Playoffs since entering the NHL in 1967 when they defeated the Dallas Stars 4-3 at American Airlines Center in Game 3 of the Western Conference Second Round on Tuesday.

Pat Maroon’s goal with 1:38 remaining in the third period gave the Blues a 2-1 lead in the best-of-7 series and their fourth victory in as many road games during the 2019 playoffs, equaling the St. Louis record for longest road winning streak in the playoffs set in 1969. St. Louis won all three road games against the Winnipeg Jets in the first round. The Blues’ record for road wins in one playoff season is six, set in 2016.
The Blues led 2-1 entering the third period but saw Dallas tie the game twice before Maroon scored. His goal gave the Blues the lead for the fourth and final time. St. Louis is the second team in the 2019 playoffs to win when taking four separate leads. The New York Islanders did it against the Pittsburgh Penguins in Game 1 of the Eastern Conference First Round, a 4-3 overtime win.

Blue Jackets, Avalanche hope to capitalize on home-ice advantage
The Columbus Blue Jackets and Colorado Avalanche return home Tuesday for Game 3 in their respective best-of-7 second-round series after splitting the first two games on the road.

Columbus is back at Nationwide Arena to face the Boston Bruins (7 p.m. ET; NBCSN, CBC, SN, TVAS). It’s the first home game for the Blue Jackets since completing their historic sweep of the Presidents’ Trophy-winning Tampa Bay Lightning on April 16. Columbus, which defeated the Bruins 3-2 in double overtime in Game 2 on Saturday, has won seven of its past eight home games; the only loss was 6-2 to the Bruins on April 2.

Boston and Columbus have required overtime in each of the first two games of the second round. Six series in NHL history have started with at least three straight OT games, the most recent was the first-round series between the Blue Jackets and Washington Capitals last season.

NHL Playoff

NHL Playoff: Ben Bishop made 32 saves, Roope Hintz scored twice and the Dallas Stars beat the St. Louis Blues 4-2 on Saturday in Game 2 to even the Western Conference semifinal series.

Miro Heiskanen and Mattias Janmark also scored for the Stars.

Jaden Schwartz and Colton Parayko scored for St. Louis, and Jordan Binnington made 31 saves. The Blues had won three straight.

Game 3 is Monday night in Dallas.

Bishop bounced back after allowing three goals in 20 shots in a 3-2 loss in Game 1 on Thursday night.

Dallas scored three times in the opening 14:51 before Bishop took over.

Hintz, who added an empty-net-net goal with 3 seconds left, converted on a pass from Mats Zuccarello at 7:11. Heiskanen scored on a give-and-go with Hintz just over six minutes later.

The Blues answered 46 seconds later on Parayko’s drive from the top of the circle.

Dallas needed just 26 seconds to restore the two-goal lead, with Janmark scoring off a Jason Dickinson’s pass.

Schwartz tipped in a shot from Parayko with 1:48 left in the third. Schwartz has a team-high five goals in the first two rounds.

Blue Jackets 3, Bruins 2: Matt Duchene scored on a power play at 3:42 of the second overtime to give the Columbus Blue Jackets a 3-2 victory over the Boston Bruins early Sunday morning, tying the second-round playoff series at a game apiece.

Artemi Panarin scored twice and assisted on the winner and Sergei Bobrovsky stopped 29 shots. The Blue Jackets twice gave up a lead and twice came back to tie it.

Matt Grzelcyk and David Pastrnak scored and Tuukka Rask made 36 saves for Boston. The Bruins won the opener — also in overtime.

The series moves to Columbus for Games 3 and 4 on Tuesday and Thursday nights.
The St. Louis Blues matched their longest road winning streak in the Stanley Cup Playoffs since entering the NHL in 1967 when they defeated the Dallas Stars 4-3 at American Airlines Center in Game 3 of the Western Conference Second Round on Tuesday.

Pat Maroon’s goal with 1:38 remaining in the third period gave the Blues a 2-1 lead in the best-of-7 series and their fourth victory in as many road games during the 2019 playoffs, equaling the St. Louis record for longest road winning streak in the playoffs set in 1969. St. Louis won all three road games against the Winnipeg Jets in the first round. The Blues’ record for road wins in one playoff season is six, set in 2016.
The Blues led 2-1 entering the third period but saw Dallas tie the game twice before Maroon scored. His goal gave the Blues the lead for the fourth and final time. St. Louis is the second team in the 2019 playoffs to win when taking four separate leads. The New York Islanders did it against the Pittsburgh Penguins in Game 1 of the Eastern Conference First Round, a 4-3 overtime win.

Blue Jackets, Avalanche hope to capitalize on home-ice advantage
The Columbus Blue Jackets and Colorado Avalanche return home Tuesday for Game 3 in their respective best-of-7 second-round series after splitting the first two games on the road.

Columbus is back at Nationwide Arena to face the Boston Bruins (7 p.m. ET; NBCSN, CBC, SN, TVAS). It’s the first home game for the Blue Jackets since completing their historic sweep of the Presidents’ Trophy-winning Tampa Bay Lightning on April 16. Columbus, which defeated the Bruins 3-2 in double overtime in Game 2 on Saturday, has won seven of its past eight home games; the only loss was 6-2 to the Bruins on April 2.

Boston and Columbus have required overtime in each of the first two games of the second round. Six series in NHL history have started with at least three straight OT games, the most recent was the first-round series between the Blue Jackets and Washington Capitals last season.

76rs vs Raptors

76rs vs Raptors: In the first half of Game 2 of the Eastern Conference semifinals on Monday night, the Philadelphia 76ers were absolutely nails while the Toronto Raptors, who dominated absolutely every facet of Game 1, could not get anything going.

More on NBA Playoffs
76ers answer Raptors with Game 2 win: Takeaways
Even with a Joel Embiid who looked like how he felt — struggling with the stomach flu — the Sixers outrebounded the Raptors by 20 in that first half. They held the Raptors to 32 percent shooting, including only 3-of-15 from 3, while seeming to make every 3 of their own. Their bench, considered one of this team’s greatest weaknesses, was destroying the Raptors’ bench via excellent play from Greg Monroe and James Ennis. Jimmy Butler, who was a non-entity in Game 1, was aggressive on both ends, scoring 13 points in the first half and playing the high-level defense the Sixers need from him in order to upset the Raptors in this series. This may not have been the best version of the Sixers — the best version of the Sixers has an Embiid who dominates, and who doesn’t look like he’s ready to vomit — but this was a very, very good version of a Sixers team that has an incredibly high ceiling.

And yet, because of 13 Sixers turnovers, Philly led by only 13 at half. It could have been up by 20, or even 25. This game could have been on its way to a blowout. Instead, the game was still within reach for the Raptors.

A confession: At halftime, I thought the Raptors had the Sixers exactly where they wanted them. I thought that, after the Sixers were unable to pull away in that dominant first half, the Raptors were going to win it. You never want to be down 13 at half, but if there’s a good scenario in which to be down 13 at half, it was this: With the other team’s star ailing, with the other team playing some sloppy basketball, and with your open shots not falling — yet.

Enter Jimmy Butler.

It is difficult to overstate the pressure that was on the Sixers to win Game 2. In the history of the NBA, there have been 282 teams that have gone down 2-0 in a seven-game series. Only 20 of those teams have gone on to win the series. That’s seven percent.

And if the Sixers were to go on and lose this second-round series, that could mark a huge setback for the years-long Process that brought so much pain to Philadelphia 76ers fans, followed by so much promise. If they were to lose this series in resounding fashion, who knows what that could mean for the franchise’s future? Would Butler want to run it back as a Sixer? Would Tobias Harris? Would this season’s trades that so accelerated the Process look like foolish, impatient, NBA-altering moves?

The reasons the Sixers took a chance on the combustible Butler less than a year before he enters unrestricted free agency were on full display Monday night. Two nights after Butler was dominated on defense and was a non-entity on offense, he took all that pressure and willingly put them on his shoulders. He was the player the Sixers traded for. He came out with poise and aggression, setting the tone for the Sixers in that dominating first hTORONTO — Is it possible for a team to make a defiant, bold statement without scoring in the N.B.A.? In 2019? The Philadelphia 76ers, a team that seemed vastly outgunned against the Toronto Raptors in the first game of their Eastern Conference semifinals, would like a word, and possibly a time machine, to consult the basketball gods of yesterday. And that word they would like might be “outlast.”

The Sixers gutted out a series-tying win on Monday night at Scotiabank Arena, 94-89, and did so with only one of their stars playing well in an arena in which Philadelphia had not won since 2012. Neither team cracked 100 points, a rarity in today’s high-pace, no-conscience 3-point-heavy style of play. In the first round of the N.B.A. playoffs, both teams scored fewer than 100 only twice in 36 games. During the regular season, the worst offensive team in the league, the Memphis Grizzlies, averaged more than 103.

“When you shrink your rotations, it’s naïve for us to think you’re going to play a game like a track meet when it’s a fistfight. It’s a grind the whole game,” Brett Brown, the coach of the Sixers, said after the game.

Grind? Sure. Fistfight? Bring it on. But this one was a slog. The Sixers played as if they were clinging to their basketball life. Game 2 might have satisfied fans nostalgic for the N.B.A. of the 2000s, when the tortoise was favored over the hare and “SportsCenter” highlights were full of 18-foot bank shots from Tim Duncan. Philadelphia won despite shooting less than 40 percent from the field, but this style of play also might be how it advances to the next round: pure survival. The Raptors are, on paper, a deeper, more talented team. For the Sixers, slow and steady win the race.alf. He took the mantle of the team’s alpha dog on a night when none of Embiid, Harris or Ben Simmons was particularly good on the offensive end. He and Simmons played good enough defense on a Kawhi Leonard who suddenly looks like MVP-level Kawhi again — Leonard still scored 35 points, but Simmons and Butler were pests to him all night.

Butler finished with 30 points, including making all eight free throws and four of his 10 3s. He went all out on the glass and grabbed 11 rebounds. Most importantly, Butler was the end-of-game killer the Sixers needed him to be. With just over two minutes left in the fourth quarter and the shot clock running down, the Raptors doubled Embiid in the post. This was a problem for the Sixers: The Raptors had mounted a furious comeback and were now only down by four. Embiid somehow found an open Butler on the wing with a pass that looked more like a hook shot. Butler, legs splayed, launched the 3, and it found nothing but the bottom of the net. The Raptors still had a fighting chance, and Kyle Lowry still had a couple of 3s left in him to make it a nail-biter, but that Jimmy Butler 3 was ultimately the play that broke the Raptors.

Nuggets vs Blazers

Nuggets vs Blazers: The semifinals series matchup between the No. 2-seeded Denver Nuggets and the No. 3-seeded Portland Trail Blazers opened up with a bang as the Nuggets defeated the Blazers, 121-113, in Game 1 on Monday night.

The Nuggets took a 58-55 lead heading into halftime and the game was relatively close throughout, but Denver kept the lead and controlled the tempo for most of the night. Nikola Jokic continued his stellar postseason debut by leading the way with 37 points, nine rebounds, six assists and three steals. He was complimented by Jamal Murray’s 23-point and eight assist performance and Paul Millsap’s 17-point outburst in the first half.

Damian Lillard put on a superhuman performance with 39 points, but it wasn’t enough to offset the Nuggets’ trio in the opening game of this series.
After defeating the San Antonio Spurs 4-3 in the first round, the Denver Nuggets have setup a second-round matchup against the Portland Trail Blazers. The two teams are more than familiar with one another, as a division rivalry has been brewing for several seasons, further intensifying this series.

Season series: 3-1 Nuggets

Although most of the games have been close, Denver has had plenty of success against Portland over the past two seasons. The Nuggets have won six of the past seven games, with the one Portland victory coming in a game in which Denver rested Nikola Jokić, Jamal Murray and Paul Millsap.

The games were high-scoring and offense-oriented. After posting an offensive rating of 112.1 throughout the course of the regular season, the Nuggets dropped a 117.2 offensive rating in the four games against Portland. The strong offensive performance was mainly a result of hot shooting, as Denver connected on 49 percent of shots from the field and 38.4 percent from three.

Despite losing Jusuf Nurkic to a season-ending leg injury towards the end of the regular season, Portland has continued to thrive, having just knocked out the Oklahoma City Thunder in five games. The series win was Portland’s first since 2016 and third since Damian Lillard was drafted back in 2012.

Let’s take a look at the key matchups, storylines and statistics that could decide this second-round series.

Key Matchups

1) Enes Kanter vs. Jokić

The Nuggets faced two different Trail Blazers teams during the regular season. After facing a healthy Portland team in the first two matchups, the last two games between the teams occurred after Nurkic was lost for the season. Therefore, there is only a two-game sample in which Denver faced a Portland team with Kanter starting at center.
Next up for Nikola Jokic and company is a date with the No. 3 seed Portland Trail Blazers, who are coming off an impressive 4-1 series win over the Oklahoma City Thunder. The series was sealed on a wild 37-foot 3-pointer at the buzzer of Game 5 by Damian Lillard, and his play will surely be a talking point moving forward in the playoffs.

We’re going to preview the series between the Blazers and Nuggets while offering a prediction on which team will advance to the Western Conference Finals.

Warriors vs Rockets

Warriors vs Rockets: The first game of the Rockets’ playoff rematch with the Warriors ended with no shortage of controversy. There were numerous occasions in which James Harden and Paul appeared to be fouled on 3-point attempts, only for no foul calls to actually be made.

None was bigger than Harden’s 3-point attempt with a little over nine seconds remaining in the game and the Rockets trailing 103-100. Draymond Green clearly made contact on the close-out on Harden’s attempt — except the league made it clear that was the correct non-call in their Last Two Minute Report.

What ensued prior to the ejection was a scramble for a loose ball on an offensive rebound attempt by Paul. After the referee ruled that the ball went out of bounds off of the Rockets, the veteran point guard made an aggressive run towards the aforementioned referee — and made physical contact with him in the process.

Paul was then assessed his second technical of the game and ejected.

Making things even harder to swallow for the Rockets is the fact that the NBA announced today that Stephen Curry should have fouled out with 1:10 remaining in the game after making contact with Harden on the latter player’s ruled turnover. Curry would, of course, go on to hit the biggest shot of the game, a 3-pointer with roughly 21 seconds remaining that gave the Warriors a commanding 103-98 lead.

While Paul’s checkbook will take a hit, the Rockets thankfully won’t be missing their starting point guard for Game 2 on Tuesday night at Oracle Arena. Although the Rockets have yet to play a home game, they absolutely cannot afford to fall in a 2-0 hole against the defending NBA champions.

One thing is for certain — the Rockets will be hoping for a difference in officiating this time around.
After having issues with the officiating in Game 1 of their second-round series against the Warriors, the Rockets are likely displeased to see who is working Game 2 Tuesday.

The league announced Scott Foster, a 25-year veteran official, will be part of the four-official crew, which also features an alternate.
Foster has not worked a Houston game since Feb. 21, when James Harden fouled out in a 111-106 loss to the Lakers. After the contest, Harden called Foster, “just rude and arrogant” and said he shouldn’t officiate any more Rockets games because his treatment of the team is “personal.” He was fined for his comments.

After Sunday’s Game 1 loss, Harden said he wants a “fair chance” from the officials after some issues concerning potentially missed fouls against Golden State on Harden jump shots. Draymond Green said Harden has fouled defenders like himself on his jump shots.

Chris Paul was also fined for “reckless” contact with an official during the Game 1 loss. He was ejected late in the game after a controversial call.

In addition to all of this, it was reported on Monday that the Rockets talked with the league about 81 potentially missed calls from Game 7 of their 2018 Western conference finals series against the Warriors. The team claimed the missed calls prevented them from winning the title even though they also missed 27 consecutive threes in that same game.

Bucks vs Celtics

Bucks vs Celtics: Giannis Antetokounmpo and the Milwaukee Bucks host Kyrie Irving and the Boston Celtics Tuesday, with tipoff from the Fiserv Forum set for 8 p.m. ET. Boston surprised many by taking Game 1 on the road in commanding fashion.

The Celtics went into Milwaukee and won by 22, despite being an eight-point underdog. Both teams will be without the service of one of their key players, as Boston will be missing Marcus Smart (oblique) and Milwaukee won’t have Malcolm Brogdon (foot). Milwaukee is listed as a 7.5-point home favorite, while the over-under for total points is 219.5 in the latest Celtics vs Bucks odds. Before you make any Celtics vs. Bucks picks or NBA Playoffs 2019 predictions, you’ll want to see what SportsLine’s advanced computer model has to say.

The model, which simulates every game 10,000 times, is crushing its NBA picks. It entered Week 28 of the 2018-19 NBA season with a sterling record on its top-rated picks, returning more than $3,100 in profit to anybody following them. And it has been particularly red-hot on its A-rated NBA money line picks, entering Week 28 on a strong 85-60 run. Anybody who has followed it is way up.

Now it has locked in on Celtics vs. Bucks. We can tell you it’s leaning under, and it also says one side of the spread hits in nearly 70 percent of simulations. You can only see that selection at SportsLine.

The model is well aware of how much better Milwaukee has been on its home court this season. The Bucks’ 33-8 record was just one win short of the NBA’s best home record, and they finished with a terrific 61 percent cover rate against-the-spread when playing in the Fiserv Forum. Meanwhile, the Celtics had just a 48.8 percent cover rate when playing on the road. In fact, Boston struggled against-the-spread in general this season, carrying a 50 percent cover rate that is down significantly from Milwaukee’s NBA-best 62.2 percent cover rate.

Normally elite teams go a bit overvalued by Vegas, as evidenced by sub-50 percent cover rates for each of the Warriors, Raptors, 76ers, Celtics and Thunder. That was not the case for Milwaukee, a team that was actually undervalued all year.
But just because Milwaukee has been excellent on its home floor doesn’t mean it will win or cover the Celtics vs. Bucks spread Tuesday night in the NBA Playoffs 2019.

The model also knows that this Boston team has found a new level in the postseason. Brad Stevens has shown a consistent ability to have his teams more well-prepared than their opponents in the playoffs, so the fact that Milwaukee was much better during the regular season might not matter much. Even without the help of Irving and Gordon Hayward, the Celtics were able to make it to the Eastern Conference Finals last year, on the back of a sterling 9-3 against-the-spread record in the first two rounds. They swept a well-respected Pacers squad in Round 1 of this year’s playoffs, which included a perfect 4-0 mark against-the-spread.

Plus, we saw Stevens and this Celtics squad dismantle the Bucks in the first round last year, and their defensive schemes similarly frustrated Antetokounmpo in Game 1 of this year’s series.

In the wake of a calamitous Game 1 against the Boston Celtics, the Milwaukee Bucks didn’t look at themselves in the mirror. What you see in a mirror doesn’t always give you a full picture, especially of things that happened outside of that moment.

Instead, they sought truth in looking over the game film of Sunday’s debacle.

“Film don’t lie,” point guard Eric Bledsoe said. “People can say what they want; once it gets on film they can see what really happened.”

What the Bucks saw was a version of themselves that looked nothing like the prior 86 games.

Celtics forward Daniel Theis dunks as Bucks forwards Giannis Antetokounmpo and Ersan Ilyasova watch Sunday.
Celtics forward Daniel Theis dunks as Bucks forwards Giannis Antetokounmpo and Ersan Ilyasova watch Sunday. (Photo: Mike De Sisti / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

They were sluggish with a lack of urgency, damning traits for a playoff game. The ball got stuck on offense, and the defense surrendered open look after open look. MVP front-runner Giannis Antetokounmpo looked powerless against Boston’s size and traps while his supporting cast was anything but supportive, with players missing open shots – or worse – being hesitant of taking them.

“I think as a team we didn’t compete as hard as we could compete” Antetokounmpo said, “and we have to be better going into Game 2.”

Game 2 of their Eastern Conference semifinal series at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Fiserv Forum will be the most critical game played in Milwaukee in nearly two decades. If the Bucks can’t rebound from a 22-point loss, they could find themselves watching as a magical regular season gets flushed down the drain.

Things have to change if the Bucks are going to even the series before it shifts to Boston. There’s no question about that. Everyone at the Bucks’ downtown practice facility Monday would agree with that point.

However, the Bucks are not inclined to believe major changes need to be made. The consensus from their point of view is they’ve been successful all season and can continue to ride those habits and schemes to future success. They contend the issue on Sunday was they got away from who they are, not that their scheme and management are flawed.

“I think when we’re us that’s when we’re at our best,” said coach Mike Budenholzer, who noted the Bucks failed to meet their standards in Game 1. “I think sometimes adjustments and all those things are actually somewhat overrated.”

Antetokounmpo was even more forceful with his words. When asked about the need for noteworthy changes – adjustments to the rotation, playing time, etc. – Antetokounmpo shook his head and repeatedly dismissed the notion out of hand.

Tottenhamhotspur vs Ajax

Tottenhamhotspur vs Ajax: The semifinal round of the UEFA Champions League gets underway on Tuesday in London at Tottenham Hotspur Stadium as Spurs host Ajax under the lights in the first leg. In an enticing battle between two surprise teams in the competition, it’s the Dutch side that is looking to once again shine on the road, while Spurs hope to overcome a weekend loss at home to West Ham in Premier League action.

Ajax enters this game having gone on the road to eliminate Real Madrid and Juventus in previous rounds, but this time they’ll have the first leg on the road, aiming to return to Amsterdam with the advantage. Tottenham is still without star striker Harry Kane, but without him they’ve been able to make the last four and stay in the top four in the Premier League.

The match is set for 3 p.m. ET, and here’s our match preview. You can watch the match on fuboTV (Try for free).

CBS Sports will be with you the entire way, updating this story with the latest scores, highlights and analysis.
One of these two teams, Tottenham Hotspur and Ajax, will play in the Champions League final at the Wanda Metropolitano in June. The fun part is seperating them. Ajax have knocked out Real Madrid and Juventus and Spurs have sent Manchester City and Borussia Dortmund packing. This one should be no less explosive than any of the other ties.

What time does the Tottenham Hotspur vs Ajax game start at?

The Champions League semi-final season clash between Spurs and Ajax will be played at the Tottenham Hotspur Stadium on Tuesday April 30 2019 at 21:00 CEST.

Find out what time the match gets underway where you are in the world.

Where can I watch Spurs vs Ajax?
No matter where you are on the planet, you can see what channel the Spurs vs Ajax semi-final first leg tie is available on here.

United States: Univision Deportes, B/R Live, TNT USA, Univision Deportes En Vivo, Univision, Watch TNT, Univision NOW
United Kingdom: BT Sport 4K UHD, BBC Radio 5 Live, BT Sport Live, BT Sport 2
Is the game online?
The Champions League game between Tottenham Hotspur and Ajax is available in most countries through the rights holders’ online platform, if they have one. Your best bet is to check who is broadcasting the game in your country and see if they have an online platform or iOS or Android app to watch it through.

For example, in the United States, Univision have a streaming service and you will need log-in details to acces that and BT Sport, in the UK, also have a streaming service.
Tottenham play Ajax in the first leg of their Champions League semi-final tonight. It’ll be a tense watch for Rafael van der Vaart, a striker who spent time at both clubs.

The ex-Netherlands international has recently announced he’s entering a professional darts tournament.

Tottenham vs Ajaxx

Tottenham vs Ajaxx:  Then in injury time City thought they scored the goal they needed to progress to the last four when Raheem Sterling struck from close range.

However, replays showed Sergio Aguero was marginally offside and the goal was chalked off. meaning Tottenham were through to their first European Cup semi-final in 57 years. 

But had video assistant referees existed in 1962 Spurs might have been the first English side to win the prestigious competition.

Legendary Tottenham manager Bill Nicholson was convinced officials got it wrong in their semi-final first leg at Benfica where the prolific Eusebio was the star.

As a Dutchman it goes against my principles to say this but Spurs have to stop Frenkie de Jong. He is unbelievable. You have never seen a player like him. He is like Johan Cruyff in the pass but deeper and if he can’t pass it he runs away from you. That is why he is going to Barcelona in the summer for €75m.

From bedlam to the Bernabéu – how Ajax performed a miracle
Read more
Since De Jong came on to the international scene last year, the Netherlands team has developed. Before him, we did not go to the Euros or the World Cup but with him we are a very good country again. We have beaten Germany, we have beaten France and it’s only because of him. You have to stop him. If you don’t, he will kill you.

The Ajax way with Cruyff is to play 4-3-3, with one No 6 and two No 8s, but the current team is slightly different because De Jong is better if he can drop in and then start playing. So they’ve decided to play with two No 6s – Lasse Schöne and De Jong – and one No 10, who is Donny van de Beek. Watch him. He was a 13-year-old kid in the youth system when I was the Ajax manager. So the system is 4-2-3-1, although Van de Beek is playing high up. He’s almost like a nine-and-a-half.

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Erik ten Hag on Ajax’s ‘unfair advantage’ in Champions League match at Spurs – video
Hakim Ziyech is on the right wing but he is more like a midfield player. He drifts in, plays in spaces and he is a passer. If he has got the ball, the others will attack the spaces and run in behind. David Neres, the Brazilian, who is a very good talent, comes off the left and Dusan Tadic, the old Southampton player, is up front, even though he is not a No 9. But Tadic plays there and that is very difficult for big centre-halves like Toby Alderweireld and Jan Vertonghen.

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If I was Spurs, I would sign Ziyech. He is not the strongest but he is developing into a very good player. There is one thing. Look at Tadic. He was an average player in the Premier League but in the Netherlands, he is one of the best in the league. In the Netherlands, it’s not as difficult as people think.

Ajax play first press all the time. They play high up. But remember what José Mourinho did with Manchester United in the 2017 Europa League final against Ajax? He did not build up. As soon as you build up against Ajax, they will get the ball high up because their first press is amazing. But if Spurs can avoid the first press, their next pass can be deadly.

Ajax’s centre-half Matthijs de Ligt is probably the best young defender in Europe now – he will go for €80m or something this summer to Barcelona, United or wherever – and the left-back, Nicolás Tagliafico, is very good going forward. But if he is going forward, there is always space behind him.

Christian Eriksen could get Spurs players into that area but who? They need runners but they don’t have runners for the first leg, with Son Heung-min suspended and Harry Kane injured. Maybe Lucas Moura can come into the space but not Fernando Llorente. He is too immobile.

I’d like to see Spurs play 3-4-3. If they play like Ajax – 4-2-3-1 – they will have a big problem with Ziyech spare
With Llorente, you have to play on the front foot all the time, you have to attack and dominate and play in their box. But Ajax play through you and hit you on the break. Spurs are also very good with the first press but Ajax could play around them, particularly with De Jong. As a Spurs man, that is my worry.

I will be sad to see Harry Winks miss out and I’d worry if Moussa Sissoko did not make it because you need somebody who can break up the transitions, which Ajax are very good at. Maybe Eric Dier can do that. I’d like to see Spurs play 3-4-3 and then they’d have a good chance. If they play like Ajax – 4-2-3-1 – they will have a big problem with Ziyech as the spare midfielder.

The thing about Ajax is they don’t care one bit about Spurs. Or Real Madrid, or Juventus – both of whom they’ve outplayed and beaten away from home this season. They play a bit like the Netherlands 25 years ago. When they play against the biggest teams, they are so good because they don’t care. It’s going to be a fascinating game.

Ajax vs Spurs

Ajax vs Spurs:The UEFA Champions League semifinals are finally upon us, and the first leg of both matchups takes place this week. On Tuesday, the two underdogs meet in London as Tottenham Hotspur welcome Ajax on what promises to be a fascinating European night.

Spurs vs. Ajax
Date: Tuesday, April 30
Time: 3:00 PM ET
Venue: Tottenham Hotspur Stadium, London, England
TV Channels: TNT, UDN, Univision
Streaming: fuboTV (watch for free)
It is a big surprise to see these two in the Final Four of the Champions League, but they have earned it by knocking out some huge teams on their way to the semis: Spurs dominated their Round of 16 against Borussia Dortmund before eliminating Manchester City in what was one of the most memorable 90 minutes in the history of the game in the quarterfinals; Ajax have been the true giant killers of the competitions, destroying the defending champions Real Madrid in the Round of 16 before knocking out Cristiano Ronaldo and Juventus to reach the semifinal.

Now the two teams come into a very even matchup with a huge chance to make the Final in Madrid. The first leg on Tuesday might be the most important of the two games: Ajax have been incredible away from home, and Spurs will play this one without their two best players, Heung-Min Son and Harry Kane. If the Dutch once again win on the road, it’d be a huge step to a place in the title match. But Tottenham has shown in this competition how much they love the drama, and even a bad result at home wouldn’t scare them going into the second leg.

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The Champions League semifinals kick off Tuesday when the two biggest surprises of the competition meet up in London. Tottenham, fresh from knocking out Manchester City in the competition, welcomes Ajax to Tottenham Hotspur Stadium for the first leg. Ajax, like Spurs, is riding a massive wave of confidence. The Dutch club knocked out Juventus, one of the favorites and three-time reigning champ Real Madrid on its way to the semis. It’s a clash of two teams that nobody had making it this far, and only one will come out on top and become the surprise finalist.

Here’s how you can watch the match and what to know:

Champions League: Tottenham vs. Ajax
Streaming: fuboTV (Try for free)
Odds: Tottenham +130 / Ajax +200 / Draw +250
CBS Sports will be with you the entire way, updating this story with the latest scores, highlights and analysis. If you are unable to view the live updates below, please click here.

Storylines
Tottenham: It remains to be seen if Harry Kane can return for these matches with his ankle injury, and if he can’t go, things could get a little complicated. Son Heung-Min is out of the first leg due to suspension. It’s a different looking Spurs with Lucas Moura in the final third, but without Son and Kane, this team may have to rely on Fernando Llorente in attack.

Ajax: No fear and nothing to lose. By knocking off Real Madrid and Juventus, this team couldn’t have any more confidence. On the road it has won at Real and Juve in the knockout stage, so against a weakened Spurs team, why can’t they do it again? They’ll gladly take a draw with goals though, and they will go forward in numbers to get at least one away goal.

Tottenham vs. Ajax prediction
A fantastic match with plenty of chances sees Tottenham get the narrow win, but an away goal from Ajax keeps the door wide open for them to move on.

Tottenham will look to move one step closer to a maiden Champions League final when they face surprise package Ajax in the first leg of their last-four clash on Tuesday night.

Spurs ousted Manchester City in stunning fashion at the quarter-final stage, though two top-flight defeats since then – which takes their tally for the season to 17 across all competitions – have led to questions over possible fatigue within a squad who have now lost their unbeaten record at the new stadium.

Mauricio Pochettino will be without the likes of Harry Kane, Heung-min Son, Serge Aurier and Erik Lamela against a vibrant, Eredivisie-leading Ajax side that have claimed the notable scalps of holders Real Madrid and Cristiano Ronaldo’s Juventus in successive rounds.

However, the Argentine is unconcerned regarding those absentees and the potential for tiredness, insisting at his pre-match press conference that it is “impossible” not to be excited for such a grand occasion.

“It’s going to be a magic night,” he added. “To play a [Champions League] semi-final in our new stadium is something nobody could think a few months ago.”

Avengers Endgame

Avengers: Endgame: Spoiler alert: This essay includes no specific single plot points from Avengers: Endgame, but does mention some broad plot ideas that could be considered significant spoilers.

At three hours long, Avengers: Endgame is a lot of movie, which means it has a lot of room for the things fans love about the Marvel Cinematic Universe — as well as the things some critics find frustrating about it. Sometimes, it’s both thrilling and frustrating at the same time — especially when it’s a movie dealing with time travel.

Part of the movie’s long, winding story involves the core Avengers (who survived the apocalyptic population-halving “snap” at the end of Avengers: Infinity War) circling back to crucial moments in MCU history. Over the course of 22 films, the MCU has become increasingly insular, complicated, and self-involved. The story that began in 2008 with Iron Man, which was at least vaguely grounded in real-world concerns about arms trafficking and global politics, is now principally concerned with splitting up and recombining its impressive roster of characters. For every Black Panther, a movie based in real-world racism and resonance, there’s an Infinity War that feels like a fan convention. Endgame doubles down on that vibe by blatantly playing back some of the MCU’s greatest hits, for action and humor purposes.

Photo: Film Frame / Marvel Studios
Endgame’s use of time travel is a definitive case of self-referentialism, but it’s also a wonderfully comic book-y conceit, and it allows for satisfying riffs on past MCU sequences — both famous and not. As good time-travel stories tend to do, it hits some poignant notes about the scarcity of time and the bittersweet nature of nostalgia. And those notes apply to the MCU itself, in a metatextual way, as well. There have been so many Marvel superhero adventures over the past 11 years, but there haven’t been that many actual Avengers movies. There was the groundbreaking smash-hit original; a less broadly loved, but wildly ambitious and underrated sequel; and the Infinity War / Endgame duology, which isn’t exactly one movie split in two, but doesn’t exactly feel like a pair of separate films, either.

Part of this has to do with Infinity War, which has “Avengers” in its title, but doesn’t have much to do with any of the iterations of the team from the two previous Avengers movies, or the de facto Avengers side-quel Captain America: Civil War. Its gargantuan crossover event folds in the Guardians of the Galaxy, previously lurking bad guy Thanos, and the Black Panther ensemble, among others. These aren’t just new or alternate Avengers. Infinity War and Endgame both count basically the entire universe as Avengers.

A lot of fans love Infinity War, but it’s a cluttered movie without a lot of breathing room. (The pace, after all, is breathless.) Endgame, on the other hand, takes a deep breath at the outset, rejoining its characters slowly. There’s more reflection, stronger acting from the talented ensemble, and more memorable shot compositions than directors Joe and Anthony Russo usually manage. Amid the downbeat aftermath of the snap, there’s also the pleasure of watching the movie reassemble the original Avengers: Iron Man, Captain America, Thor, the Hulk, Black Widow, and Hawkeye, with a manageable handful of newer recruits like Ant-Man, Nebula, and Captain Marvel. The pared-down ensemble has more screen time, and less superpowered flexing. Even when the movie starts getting nuttier, with its time travel and magical stones, it’s less action-packed and more character-driven than its predecessor.

Photo: Film Frame / Marvel Studios
It’s all a reminder of how adaptable and varied these characters can be — but the reminder comes just as Marvel is winding many of them down. Part of Endgame’s bittersweetness derives from the fact that, regardless of how the series continues (and most of these characters likely will be seen again, some of them very soon), the Avengers from 2012 probably aren’t getting back together any time soon. Some of this melancholy is the natural byproduct of how great these actors are at playing these lovable characters. Some of it is effective filmmaking, though the Russos are also prone to milking emotions without really crystallizing them in concise images.

And some of the melancholy derives from the MCU’s series-wide tendency to rush past its best moments in pursuit of grand, crowd-pleasing crossover events. Those crossovers sometimes deemphasize what these movies do best. While the cinematic house style of the Marvel movies can become rote, Endgame shows how much life there is left in these characters’ relationships. The movie gets a lot of mileage out of, say, the Hulk trying to comfort a drunken, desolate Thor, or Black Widow forlornly looking over her peanut butter sandwich as Captain America watches.

These scenes might sound silly or manipulative on paper, but they’re more engaging than many of the MCU’s digital action sequences. Massive fights like the ones in Endgame’s back half have gotten more frequent these last few years, as the core Marvel characters have been thrown around from event to event. Changes to the status quo are made (S.H.I.E.L.D. is Hydra, the Avengers break up), undone (Tony Stark un-retires, Captain America returns to the grid), and hastily made again (half the heroes are dusted) in service of a bigger master plot. It would have been entertaining and novel to keep some extra company with the Avengers in the space between the big changes and the triumphant reunion — to see an Avengers sequel or two with more shawarma sit-downs, more casual house parties, more Thor / Hulk heart-to-hearts, and more peanut butter sandwiches. Less obsession over the Infinity Stones, and more characters. More world-saving, but less universe-dominating.

Photo: Film Frame / Marvel Studios
Imagine a rejiggered Phase Three of the MCU that took more time to let these characters breathe the way Endgame’s best moments do. Maybe Captain America: Civil War could have been reconceived as the Avengers sequel it kind of was already, leaving room for a separate Captain America movie following him on a smaller-scale adventure closer to, say, James Mangold’s The Wolverine. Infinity War could have been freed from the Avengers moniker, and focused more intently on Thanos — a villain-as-protagonist gambit that the filmmakers claimed to have performed, but ultimately hedged on. And Endgame could still function as an Avengers reunion / finale.

Obviously, what the MCU did instead was no mistake. Box-office records have been smashed. Fans are delighted; shareholders are delighted. It’s just hard to shake the feeling that some of Endgame’s predecessors existed primarily to goose anticipation for this latest astronomically grossing MCU event. (It’s an effective strategy for getting people to fill in their personal MCU blanks — in particular, Endgame cleverly makes Thor: The Dark World feel more essential than it ever was before.) Some fans claim that any lack of connectivity is the problem with, say, Age of Ultron, as compared to the newer Avengers movies: it isn’t smooth or assured enough in moving along the series’ master plot. Others will claim to have been waiting 11 years for Endgame.

But why? There were 20 other MCU movies between Iron Man and Endgame, and there was room enough for more material that explored these characters’ human sides rather than focusing on Infinity Stone collection, and serving as a temporary holding area for characters before routing them to a massive showdown.

In some ways, Kevin Feige’s dynamic of always teasing the next project is true to life. Many of us do, in fact, live our lives in anticipation of some promised excitement in the future. Given the MCU’s status as a self-perpetuating forever franchise, it’s admirable that Marvel is willing to draw its stories to a close — at least for some characters. But the MCU’s strength has rarely been in endings. The original Avengers’ rapturous finale is the exception, not the rule. These films’ gargantuan action sequences get all their flavor from the meaningful moments between them.

And that idea is wonderfully literalized during Endgame’s time travel scenes. Amid some major action moments from the movies’ past, the characters create smaller, more satisfying grace notes for their new movie. That should come across as self-regarding, but it doesn’t. If anything, it feels like Marvel didn’t entirely realize what it had until it was almost gone, and took the opportunity to improve on its own past. Endgame is a strong outing for the Avengers, but it also highlights how much more time and space we needed with these characters.